The US 2020 Election Was Attacked, But Not Disrupted

U.S Federal Authorities were cautiously optimisitic early Wednesday about having completed a successful voting season without major cyber attack or service disruption. Authorities cautioned that could still happen in the next coming days, however, there has been no major cyber attack on the U.S democratic process to elect the next President of the United States.

U.S Federal Authorities were cautiously optimistic early Wednesday about having completed a successful voting season without major cyber attack or service disruption. Authorities cautioned that could still happen in the next coming days, however, there has been no major cyber attack on the U.S democratic process to elect the next President of the United States.

“We’re not out of the woods yet,” said one senior official with the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), who briefed reporters with other U.S. officials on the condition they not be identified.

“For the most part today it’s been a little boring and that’s a good thing — this is kind of one of those best-case scenarios that we would hope for,” the senior official said.

Lessons Learned from 2016

In 2016, The Russian Government unleashed a trove of measures at the U.S Presidential Election where Hillary Clinton (D) faced off against the current incumbent President, Donald Trump (R) geared toward assisting Donald Trump in winning the election.

Technically, the attacks never stopped, but since then, Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) worked together to forge new relationships between the public and private sectors with the common goal of stopping future election process disruption by means of cyber attack.

American officials acknowledge they can’t detect or defeat everything, which is why part of the task since the 2016 election has been working at every level on the ability to adapt to a newly adverse environment.

CISA and the FBI have posted a number of public bulletins about prospective cyber-dangers to U.S. elections infrastructure or the information environment, likely the result of action by CYBERCOM and the National Security Agency as well as new surveillance about what’s taking place within American networks.

Authorities took about 27 hours from the point at which they learned about Iranian spoof-email intimidation attacks to attributing them to announcing them in an unusual news conference with Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe and FBI Director Christopher Wray.

Authorities’ goal is to deny foreign spreaders of disinformation, for example, the ability to try to gain credibility by building up a body of work on social networks or their own websites. When the FBI detected such a scheme that involved Facebook, the bureau acted as swiftly as possible to try to snuff it out, Wray said.

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Cybersecurity Engineer | Website

Jordan is a Cybersecurity Engineer who has consulted in numerous sectors such as finance, education, manufacturing, and public sector organizations within the United States.